CyberNation


Title:                      CyberNation

Author:                  Steve Perry

Perry, Steve (2001). Tom Clancy’s Net Force: CyberNation. New York: Berkley Books

LCCN:    2002553762

PS3553.L245 C9 2001

Date Updated:  March 7, 2017

This series follows Net Force, a division of the FBI set up to deal with net crimes in 2010. CyberNation deals with a group trying to form a nation based completely on the net. Their main goal throughout the book is to get more people to sign up with them, so that they have the numbers to get the attention of current nations. To get people to join, they disrupt the internet, in a not very legal way, and so Net Force is called in. The rest of the book is Net Force trying to catch the hackers doing the disruptions.

In the year 2010, computers are the new superpowers. Those who control them control the world. To enforce the Net Laws, Congress creates the ultimate computer security agency within the FBP the Net Force.

When web service is disrupted across the world, a new nation makes its presence known. Terrorists from a virtual country called CyberNation have taken the web hostage. Their demands: worldwide recognition and rights for their “citizens.” Though there are millions of CyberNation sympathizers, Net Force rallies its troops for an all-out war on three fronts — politically, physically, and electronically — because dealing with terrorists is never an option.

In general this series has a very well thought out description of what needs to be done to protect and police the net. Having said that, I have noticed that the Net Force books have been going downhill, and this one continues that trend. A lot of time is spent on character development, but no development actually comes out of it. For example, we see Jay Gridley question his upcoming marriage. But in the end, the final decision has nothing to do with the pages of inner questioning that he goes through. Then there is the introduction of new ‘toys’ for the military that never show up again. Add to that the fact that every other scene leads to sex, and that there is almost no technology description, this book is only a shadow of Clancy’s work.

To me, this series has become a soap opera, with most of the time spent on generic character development and sex, and very little time spent on the action and descriptions that brought me to Clancy in the first place.

 

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